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Fear - Michael  Grant 'Fear' by Michael Grant is the second-to-last book in the 'Gone' series and it is, by far, the darkest (literally) and perhaps creepiest of the books thus far.

The setting, as all avid Gone fans know, is Perdido Beach (Lost Beach), California. In 'Gone,' the first book, a sphere with a diameter of 20 miles suddenly appeared centered around a nuclear reactor, and at the same time everyone over the age of 15 disappeared from within the dome (the Fayz).

Much has happened since that time (including three more books) and in this, the fifth book, the dome is changing. The kids in the Fayz, at least those still left alive after months of starvation, plagues, mutations, fighting, monstrous creatures and monstrous kids, will have to face utter darkness before the end of the book.

What sets Grant's writing apart from much YA horror is that his characters are not two-dimensional. The heroes have flaws. Both Sam and Astrid have huge flaws. In 'Fear,' Sam realizes that he's not meant to be a leader -- and that is one of his flaws (his inability to lead). Astrid has huge regrets in 'Fear' and finally lets herself relax. Instead of feeling like she has to be the perfect genius, she allows herself to just be a teenager and let her feelings for Sam develop.

'Fear' by Michael Grant is the second-to-last book in the 'Gone' series and it is, by far, the darkest (literally) and perhaps creepiest of the books thus far.

The setting, as all avid Gone fans know, is Perdido Beach (Lost Beach), California. In 'Gone,' the first book, a sphere with a diameter of 20 miles suddenly appeared centered around a nuclear reactor, and at the same time everyone over the age of 15 disappeared from within the dome (the Fayz).

Much has happened since that time (including three more books) and in this, the fifth book, the dome is changing. The kids in the Fayz, at least those still left alive after months of starvation, plagues, mutations, fighting, monstrous creatures and monstrous kids, will have to face utter darkness before the end of the book.

What sets Grant's writing apart from much YA horror is that his characters are not two-dimensional. The heroes have flaws. Both Sam and Astrid have huge flaws. In 'Fear,' Sam realizes that he's not meant to be a leader -- and that is one of his flaws (his inability to lead). Astrid has huge regrets in 'Fear' and finally lets herself relax. Instead of feeling like she has to be the perfect genius, she allows herself to just be a teenager and let her feelings for Sam develop.
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In one of Grant's many youtube videos, Michael Grant Egmont Promo (created by his computer genius son, Jake), he says, "I'm very interested in the idea of the universe as a system, operated essentially by software, so that the rules of the universe, cause and effect, action and reaction, the speed of light, that sort of stuff, are essentially software, and potentially could be hacked and potentially could be rewritten. I love the idea that you could get into the software of the universe just as you could the software of a computer and decide to make changes."


Read the whole review at: http://www.examiner.com/young-adult-fiction-in-chicago/fear-by-michael-grant-is-the-darkest-of-the-gone-series-yet-review